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Mod in the USA

Jackie and I were asked to contribute to Dwell magazine's blog in conjunction with their Made in USA issue.

We were tickled that they asked, and told them we'd be more than happy to submit some articles. We asked them what they had in mind and they told us to offer up something from Oklahoma that was uniquely American. That sounded easy. The first thing that came to mind for me was the unique assortment of works by Bruce Goff located in the Sooner State. So here's our brief slideshow of Goff in Oklahoma...

Bruce Goff in Oklahoma

Enjoy.

Recycled Plant Stand

We've had this plant stand sitting around for years.It was one of those multi-tiered, folding jobs made from wood- very Seventies. Like the brochure might have had a macrame owl hanging on the wall behind it.

We had no use for it but I just couldn't bring myself to throw the thing away. I kept looking at those 2" x 2" lengths of wood and seeing a cool table or room divider hidden within.

Jackie came up with the idea for a Nelson-esque table. So we took it apart and started playing Lincoln Logs. We arranged the different lengths of wood into various configurations. Just to avoid litigation (wink*) we added two short "accents" on each side. A set of hairpin legs Jackie had scored at an estate sale completed the project.

It's not a real Nelson Platform Bench, but for less than $10 of hardware I think it's pretty cool.

Goff's Most "Usual" Design

Bruce Goff is known for his unusual architecture. So our visit to the home he designed for the Cox family in 1949 was a bit of a surprise.

From the street it's easily the most "usual" home by Bruce Goff we have ever seen. It even has vertical walls, brick veneer and square corners. There are no spheres or conversation pits or Klingon-inspired roof escarpments. It would be easy to overlook the Cox House. Odds are you'd miss it- even if someone told you to keep an eye out for a Bruce Goff house in Boise City.

Tulsa's Airport-henge

The terminal at Tulsa International Airport is a classic example of Sixties modernism. Built in 1963 it was designed by the local firm of Murray-Jones-Murray and was highly acclaimed at the time.

Just west of Tulsa International Airport's main terminal lies the less elegant general aviation area. This area is actually the original site of Tulsa Municipal Airport- the precursor to the sleek, jet-age airport most of us use today.

The general aviation area serves private planes and some military aircraft that stop in for refueling.

Near the corner of North Sheridan and Apache is where the original airport terminal building used to stand. Today on that site you'll find the local headquarters of the FAA and National Weather Service. This building is adorned with a variety of unique concrete forms on walls, benches and even this stylized windsock statue.




If you're interested in seeing what the original airport terminal looked like head north from here about a mile and visit the

What Not to Wear: Atoka Edition

Ever been through Atoka?

Of course you say, it's on the road to Dallas!

But have you ever ventured off US-75? If so, you may have noticed the Atoka County Courthouse.

The building is built of lovely sandstone and has those really cool swoopy concrete awnings. Sorry, but I don't know what they're really called- cool swoopy concrete seems appropriate. Maybe we can say CSC for short?

Anyway, the CSC theme continues along the side of the building, as shown below:


But look closely.

Almost as entertaining as the CSC shapes are the highly inappropriate porch lamps someone decided to stick on the side of the building. Not one, but a whole slew of lovely carriage lights! Can you say, gift card from Home Depot? So here's our nomination for the What Not to Wear category- congratulations to the Atoka County Courthouse!




Modern Choices