Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from April, 2008

Meet Modern Tulsa

The Tulsa Foundation for Architecture (TFA) has formed a Modern Tulsa committee to increase awareness of the city's architectural treasure since the Art Deco period. The group will be holding their first soiree on May 8, 2008 and the public is invited.

There is no charge to attend, but an RSVP would be appreciated. Contact Shane Hood at 918-587-2282 (work) or 918-810-7271 (cell) or email shane.hood@selserschaefer.com

In official-speak Modern Tulsa is described thus:

"Modern Tulsa is a volunteer endeavor focused on enhancing the appreciation of Tulsa's 20th Century Modern Design and Pop-Culture Heritage. Operating as a committee of the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture, Modern Tulsa aims to perpetuate Tulsa's Modern Heritage via promotion, preservation and education."

This modern mixer will be held at the Fadem residence, an early Sixties home featured in Tulsa People last July. The Fadems also operate Retro Redo, which specializes in the restoration of mid-century…

Bowling on the Mother Road

Tulsa's iconic Rose Bowl bowling alley has been closed for almost three years now. The parabolas of concrete have been the victim of arson, vandals and a non-compete clause that won't allow anyone to open a bowling alley on the site. But the current owner, Sam Baker, claims the structure is sound. Rumors of a Route 66 museum have been tossed around for some time.

So far the only progress has been a much-needed coat of paint.

When it was announced the Googie-esque lanes were to close I rushed over with camera in hand. These pictures are from March 2005 and give you some idea just how hideous the paint scheme looked at that time. I'm happy to report it's pink again.

The Rose Bowl opened in 1962 and was designed by modernist architect Bill Ryan. He also designed the oft-maligned East Central High School and the Lutheran church that overlooks the Broken Arrow Expressway like a huge concrete chicken.

That's My Kind of Carport

During a recent visit to the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, I was reminded how many interesting homes there are in Norman. Driving north on Chautauqua Avenue we spotted one of our favorites on the corner of Brooks.

Behind the sandstone wall is a home built in 1948 designed by Oklahoma's own Bruce Goff. The house combines natural materials with straight clean lines.

Viewed from the street the H. E. Ledbetter home is probably one of Goff's more "usual" designs. Although the circular awning suspended over the drive is pretty darn unusual.

Modern Choices