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Showing posts from June, 2009

Mods from Stillwater

On a recent trip to Stillwater, Oklahoma we absorbed some of the Mid-Century karma that is sprinkled around the city. This is not an exhaustive list- just what we managed to visit in one day before we were exhausted.

First Christian Church


This beauty sits at the edge of the OSU campus on Duck just south of Hall of Fame. The unique steeple sports several bells and is flanked by the interesting roof.

Stillwater National Bank


Downtown Stillwater is dominated by this 1967 bank building at 6th and Main.


The bank features underground parking and unique "umbrellas" along the perimeter.


Above the entrance is this massive light fixture.

St. Andrews Episcopal Church


This tidy box was dedicated in 1965 on Third Street, just around the corner from Hideaway Pizza. St. Andrews has some interesting stained glass windows.


St. Andrews was designed by three church members, F. Cuthbert & Christine Salmon and Phil Wilber. I bet that awning was not their idea!

Well, that's all for now. I'm su…

Googie in Joplin

Returning from a motorcycle rally in Crane, Missouri about a year ago I came across this wonderful sign.

It's a great example of Googie style, with wacky shapes and a classic red flying wing (okay, it's really a chevron). It demands you pull in the parking lot.

The Capri Motel appeared to be intact, but not near as well preserved as this neon sign out front.


What the heck is Googie?

More Oklahoma Lustrons

We've been fascinated by the metal homes made by Lustron for many years. In fact, one of the very posts on this site was to document two examples here in Green Country (see Lustron: the Power of Steel). Now, here's an update to our search for Lustrons in Oklahoma. Turns out there are three Lustron homes in Oklahoma on the National Register of Historic Places. Two are in Stillwater and one is located in Cushing. All three are grey and appear to be the two-bedroom model. These are the two Lustrons in Stillwater. They're pretty similar except one has a mysterious aluminum patch near the entry. The real prefab gem from this trip is this beauty in Cushing. Note the contrasting trim and optional Lustron garage out back. Very nice! To locate Lustrons near you visit Lustron Preservation.org and use their handy, dandy Lustron Locator.

Seminoff-Designed Home in Nichols Hills

On the Trail of Julius Shulman: Stop 3

The third stop on our architectural tour of Oklahoma City was the low-slung McConnell Residence.

This house was the first project designed by architect George Seminoff after graduating from the University of Oklahoma. The home was commissioned in 1957 by a local asphalt magnate and is located at the corner of Greystone Avenue and Pembroke Terrace in Oklahoma City. It was featured on the cover of a Parade of Homes newspaper article in 1959.

Fast forward to 2006: the house is purchased by the current owners, Robert and Cara Barnes. They tenderly renovated this Mid-Century gem- even consulting with the original architect. And once again it's a cover feature, this time in the April 2008 issue of Metropolitan Home.

Seminoff's adoration of Frank Lloyd Wright is evident throughout the house. 60 and 30 degree angles make up most of the rooms and accents. The garage is about the only place you'll find a right-angle corner. Materials are also …

Tulsa's First Modern Home Tour a Success

The Tulsa Foundation for Architecture's first modern home tour attracted approximately 150 attendees to tour six Lortondale homes.

Beginning in 1954 about 250 low-slung modern homes were built on, what was then, the outskirts of East Tulsa. Today enthusiastic owners are restoring, renovating and repairing previous "remuddles" that were not kind to these Mid-Century classics. The tour, entitled "Living in Hi Fi", focused on some of the best examples Lortondale has to offer.

Homes featured on the tour ranged from extensively modified to nearly untouched time capsule. Lucky attendees got to see some of the most creative design Tulsa has to offer. Some of the tour attendees were former owners returning to visit their old neighborhood (below).

We thoroughly enjoyed this inaugural tour. This annual event promises to be a "do not miss" for fans of modern architecture and design.

Where to next year?



For more photos from the tour check Moderntulsa.net.

Lortondale Home Tour

Living in Hi Fi is the first annual modern home tour presented by the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture's Modern Tulsa Committee.

Please join us June 13th beginning at 5:30 pm in the Lortondale neighborhood, located just east of South Yale between 26th Street and 27th Place (map). Cost is $10 in advance or $15 on the tour.

The tour will feature six homes in various stages of renovation/restoration- from Mid-Century basket case to contemporary showplace. Visitors will be able to view the homes inside and out and meet the owners. A map of the six homes and more information will be printed on the tickets. Cameras are welcome, but please no pets except service animals.



The tour is scheduled from 5:30 pm until 8:30 pm. An after party will begin at 8:30 pm, and all tour attendees are invited.

Tickets are available in advance at Dwelling Spaces, Urban Furnishings, Ida Red Boutique and the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture office at 2210 S Main. Tickets can also be purchased at any of the hom…

Modern Choices