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Showing posts from February, 2011

Is the Page Belcher Federal Building worth saving?

There is a possibility that in several years the Page Belcher Federal Building might be vacant. In the event that happens an obscure city commission wants the building gone. Or if not removed, at least re-skinned. It was mentioned the building looks "out of place" compared to the BOK Center. I almost found that amusing. Next to the stainless steel skin of Pelli's arena it's hard for me to picture what might not look out of place. An aluminum dirigible? Or maybe a four-story mockup of a food processor? But there's nothing amusing about the Council's intentions. They appear to be poised to level the 1967 structure to make way for something less out of place. At a meeting last October several people voiced their opposition to the idea of tearing it down- which seemed to surprise the council. It's no secret that plenty of Tulsans think the building is an eyesore. I mean even the name is a handicap! Many like to compare the Page Belcher to the previous

Slipstreaming Through History

Philbrook's latest exhibit was scheduled to open last week, but a record-breaking snowstorm changed that plan. So if you're a procrastinator, or didn't even know about this exhibit, consider yourself lucky! American Streamlined Design will open on Sunday, February 13 at Philbrook. The exhibit features streamlined objects that exemplify the Golden Age of Aerodynamics, from the Twenties through the Fifties. Many of the objects on display are household items that borrow from the flowing lines of period aircraft, automobiles- even locomotives. This style celebrated the vision of a technological future where industry and science could overcome any obstacle- and do it with class. So hop in the De Soto, or gas up the dirigible, and join us in the world or tomorrow! American Streamlined Design February 13 - May 15, 2011 Philbrook Museum of Art

Unica Home: Outlet Offers Modern on the Cheap

With the recent Snowpocalypse we found ourselves with plenty of time on our hands. Fortunately we had Internet access and the power never went out. Seemed like the perfect time to surf some of my favorite websites! That includes a shop called Unica Home . I had the pleasure of visiting Unica a few years ago during a business trip to Las Vegas. I had some time to kill and decided to drop in and see their store. They have tons of cool modern gadgets and furnishings- famous name stuff like Alessi, Chilewich, Blomus, Heller, Fornasetti, Hario and such. The big news I just discovered was their new eBay Store! This is their online outlet that offers closeouts, discontinued items, one-offs and floor samples. Mod and cheap! What could be better? Check it out at stores.ebay.com/unicahome-outlet , and tell `em OK Modern sent you! Unica Home Outlet

The Recent Past

The Bruce Goff House in Vinita

We were recently surprised to learn about a Goff-designed home just an hour away from Tulsa in Vinita, Oklahoma. Vinita is probably best known to OK Mod readers as the home of the Glass House on I-44, also known as (shudder) the World's Largest Largest McDonalds . Anywho, turned out the Goff house was on the market, and the owner was more than happy to let us have a look around. We took a short drive up the turnpike one Sunday afternoon to meet the realtor, snap some pictures, ask some questions and enjoy another one of Bruce Goff's unique creations. The home is known as the Adams House and was built in 1961. The 3,700 square foot home is arranged in a circular floor plan with a large sunken "conversation pit" at the center. Rising up from this pit is a large metal fireplace, its chimney surrounded by skylights, which dominates the entire house. Rooms surround the perimeter with folding accordion doors acting as walls. To maintain some semblance of privacy an inner

The World Museum

The widening of I-44 through Tulsa will soon claim another mid-century building (see Modern Homes Make Way for I-44 ). This unusual landmark near Peoria, once known as the World Museum, is being emptied in preparation for demolition. The concrete complex was built in 1963 by the Osborn Ministries as a museum and "Interstate Temple." Self-proclaimed minister, T. L. Osborn, and his wife, Daisy, traveled the world as Christian missionaries and collected art and artifacts on their journeys. The unusual La Concha-esque building housed their partial collection and distracted motorists touring along the new Skelly Bypass (aka I-44). The exterior of the building is adorned with maps of the world's continents. In its heyday there was a good deal more- a giant outline of Jesus was on one wall. The inscription below it, "REX," provided one of my earliest Latin lessons when I asked Dad why that building had my name on it. There was also a large globe that once stood out fr

Visit to the Prairie Chicken House

This unique house on the edge of Norman, Oklahoma is known to most as the prairie chicken house. Designed by Herb Greene in 1960, he preferred to call it simply the Prairie House .  Thanks to the  Prairie House Preservation Society  (PHPS) it is now possible for the public to experience one of Oklahoma's most unusual architectural treasures.