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Showing posts from December, 2011

Photo Tour: Broken Arrow Moderns

Just a few random images. 

Tulsa's largest suburb isn't usually associated with modernism, but if you look closely there are some unique examples of Mid-Century Modern. Here's a random sampling I snapped on a cloudy day in December...
By far the best known modern structure in BA would have to be this white building on the hill. For decades this former church has been turning heads near the Broken Arrow Expressway. Some people describe it as a covered wagon, others see a cornucopia. But Jackie's nickname for it my favorite is. She has called it the "chicken church" since childhood.



Thoroughly Modern Getaway

We had been hearing about the unique hideaway called the Canebrake for years. I decided Jackie's birthday would be the perfect occasion to get out of town to sample their gourmet menu and spend the night in a cabin in the woods.


The Canebrake is located just east of Wagoner, OK on a peninsula overlooking Fort Gibson Lake. It's miles away from the city lights so it's a great place to "get away from it all."

Timely Wallpaper

Here's a holiday freebie from our friends at Design Within Reach.

Download a free 2012 calendar for your virtual desktop. Choose the size below and set it as your background wallpaper. Cool huh?



News Anchor Crashes Parade Float

No injuries reported.

Mechanical Snowman is a Local Favorite

Local modernista may be familiar with Shane Hood, he's quite active with Modern Tulsa, the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture and the Lortondale neighborhood. He also happens to be involved with another really cool non-profit called Fab Lab.

Tulsa's IPE Building Deserves Better

Orange You Glad They Painted it Grey?

Not me.

Long before it was known as the Quik Trip Center, the immense building at Expo Square behind the Golden Driller was known as the Tulsa Exposition Center. Built in 1966 to provide an indoor space for the International Petroleum Exposition, the building featured a cable-supported roof covering more than 10 acres. Distinctive orange steel supports rose up from the prairie to hold the cable system.

The architect for the project was Bert E. Griffin and David R. Graham and Associates were the structural engineers. The clever cable system floating 3,500 tons of structural steel above the exhibit floor was so unique several patents were filed. The visual impact of the building was modern, but very business-like. The wide stance of the outermost support pillars echoed the "spider legs" of architect Richard Neutra. Giant beams rose up from the roof to grasp cables, almost like a giant bridge had been covered.

The structure and its eig…

Carpet City Annexed

Oklahoma's Largest Carpet Co.

For decades the neon sign at 15th and Delaware made this claim. Or variations thereof as certain letters burned out. But the Carpet City building  recently changed hands and is currently being renovated for use as medical offices. The sign was one of the first things to go.

Unfortunately the sleek sandstone building is also losing some of its most unique characteristics. Namely, the swooping triangular carport that has been a landmark since 1948. Yesterday we drove past and saw the front of the building stripped of its Mid-Century charm.

Here's a photo of the building a from a few weeks ago. Today it's not quite as cool.

Sniff, sniff.


Modern Choices