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Dallas Round House Violated

It appears that the unique "dome" has been removed. In an article from November 2009 in the Dallas Observer: A Roundhouse Kick to the Round House, the signature iron trellis has been removed.

Dallas Round House entrance patio and dome from inside.Jackie and I visited the round house on a recent trip to the Big D (see Letter from Dallas). Unfortunately we weren't able to tour the home, but we did get a chance to see it up close and walk under the wisteria-covered entrance. At the time that visit was a bit of a letdown- now it's suddenly a cherished memory.

Here are some more photos from that visit (click to view full size)...

How the dome looked last Summer.
That huge mound of green is actually the wisteria covering the steel rods that made up the large trellis.

Goff's influence is evident in this geometric gate design.
Jackie called this the Hobbit Hole.

Tile window treatment looks identical to the Frank House in Sapulpa.
"They stole these from the Frankoma House!"

Comments

Baron Bieber said…
I don't remember visiting what seems to be (or at least had been) an interesting piece of architecture during the visit to Dallas with Prof. Fred Shellabarger back in 1977. Too bad because the dome seems just too damn cool!
Unknown said…
your photos are incredible!
stopping by to say Congrats on your Okie blog nom!

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