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Five Hundred Bucks from Lushpad

Check it out!

Our favorite mod classifieds are giving away a $500 shopping spree towards the purchase of any item listed on LushPad!

If you're looking to sell your unwanted Tiki pole lamp or wacky ashtray- now is the time! And to entice you even more Lushpad is offering you a discount code for your listing fees. Just type in JUNESPREE on the checkout page to get 50% off your listing fees. So drop in and browse, buy or sell. It's all good!


Sell your used designer and mid-century modern furniture on Lushpad!

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