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Tulsa Roof on Display

..along with a really cool house.

Modern Tulsa is hosting another super hip "Mod of the Moment" events this Sunday at the Netherton House. If that name doesn't immediately jog your memory maybe the striking roofline of this fabulous house will:

The Netherton House in Tulsa


Since that photo was taken a great deal of work has been done to the house. And the good news is it looks great! Unlike so many Mid-Century Modern homes that have been "updated," this house appears to have been lovingly refreshed with a keen eye for the unique details that make it so striking.

The home was built in 1949 and designed by James Netherton. While Netherton was not an architect he did work on many Tulsa architectural projects as an engineer. I can't help but wonder if he was a car guy too- considering how much that roof looks like a space-age gas station!

So don't miss your chance to see this great roof up close. And while you're there take a look inside too!

Mod of the Moment
Sunday, April 22, 2012
6:00 to 8:00 pm
3130 E. 44th Street in Tulsa


For more information on the home and current photos check out the listing on Zillow.

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