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Tulsans Enjoy Another Mod Moment

Modern Tulsa's second Mod of the Moment event was quite a treat for the folks that attended.

Relax on the patio and enjoy the brick monoliths.From curbside the house looked moderately interesting. The only real hint this was a notable mid-mod abode was the carport in lieu of the usual garage. But once inside the magic happened. Small windows and ceiling lights featured butterflies and leaves encased within the glass. Terrazzo floors throughout and an open floorplan made this a worthy stop for this ongoing series of open houses. I've included a few photos to give you an idea of just how cool this house really is.

Mod Moments
The "Mod of the Moment" is a series of open house events showcasing modern and contemporary homes that on the market, or soon will be. These events are a great idea for a number of reasons.

First off, fans of these "unusual" homes get to tour them along with others who appreciate the contemporary aesthetic. It's not just camaraderie though- networking like this is fun and educational. And it's not uncommon for knowledgeable architects to attend who are more than happy to answers questions.

This Tulsa home offers Mid-Century hip throughout.Second, these events raise awareness among individuals involved in the real estate market. This is important because realtors often encourage sellers to perform work on a home before it goes on the market. Realtors that have a better understanding of Mid-Century Modern are less likely to suggest inappropriate renovations.

It's not uncommon for sellers to spend money on unnecessary renovations. I can't count how many times I've heard potential buyers lamenting the recent removal of period features or "outdated" tile. This is just one more case where preservation can often be a win-win for all parties involved.

Bedroom showing unusual glass with embedded wildlife.To learn more about Modern Tulsa and future Mod of the Moment events visit www.moderntulsa.net.

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